11 July 2018

Some sheep go astray...

Can you get from this image to the topic?
JMJ
The Readings for the Memorial of St Benedict, Abbot.
Wednesday in the 14th Week of Ordinary Time (B2)
Potius ite ad oves quae perierunt domus Israel. Euntes autem praedicate, dicentes : Quia appropinquavit regnum caelorum.
Go rather to the lost sheep of the house of Israel.  And preach as you go, saying, 'The kingdom of heaven is at hand.'

Bishop Barron often makes a painful point: for every one new convert that enters the Church, six leave. In the USA alone, the second largest religious group is ex-Catholics. The largest is Catholics, as well. In the San Francisco Bay area, 25% of the population is Catholic. Although that "organized religion" thing sets us apart, the reality is that we are so lost among the 75% that folks don't see us. And often the folks not seeing us are ex-Catholics who would rather forget about us in the first place.

Go to the Lost Sheep of the House of Israel.

Although it's tempting to want to evangelize among folks who are already Christian, I think Jesus' first words of direction are important here. The lost sheep do certainly include the "separated brethren," as they are called, but they're not lost. They do not fit under the rubric of the "Nones" who have nothing to do with Organized Religion and the lapsed who just have not come back within the last 20 years. I've been amazed at the number of lapsed Catholics I know. Folks who used to go, but don't anymore. I knew folks in High School and College that put my liberal protestant piety to shame, but now probably don't have even a Bible in the house gathering dust.

I'm sure they have stories like mine: one day I woke up and didn't believe it. It made no sense to me - at least not as much sense as sex and a job, a commuter card benefit, health insurance, and a few hobbies. I wasn't cavalier enough to have only 1 hour on Sunday devoted to this private hobby so I dropped it altogether. Besides, there were other religions that were so much more fun in the first place: better food, better rituals, boutique cultural contexts, more interesting DIY functions. Everyone in every bar knew what a "christian" was: Episcopalianism was only slightly less exotic than a Rum and Coke. But no one knew what a Gnostic Pagan was. 

Others may have other reasons for leaving and more heartfelt and less egotistical than mine. But there is one story. 

How does one get back? You have to be invited. I had one afternoon of emotional sap: listening to an old LP I found in the bottom of my closet cleaning out my Sophomore year dorm room. It was of 70s Christian music, and it brought back "all the feels" as they say today. And I cried a lot. Also I left it in the dorm, along with the record player I had it on. That's how important those feels. But then one day - some 15 years later - I was invited back. The person that invited me was named Ethan. And his invite took the oddest of forms: for he only suggest that maybe, when I moved to San Francisco in 1997, I might have something in common with a local Episcopal Church. And it took me the better part of a year or two to hear the invite in my memory and respond. That community was a perfect way to get me back inside... 21 years later I think it worked, although my path has more than a thousands hairpin turns. Look, you never know how God is going to act. My invite to the Catholic Church came in the most unlikely of ways - from the husband of my Orthodox Goddaughter, who mentioned St Dominic's to me offhandedly. When the time came Nathan's recommendation calmed my nerves a bit. And by "coincidence" he was at the service when I made my profession of the Catholic faith.

Our job is to go to the lost sheep. We may not be the folks who "win them back" but Ethan and Nathan both extended invites to me.

How do we go to the Lost Sheep? How can we say the Kingdom of God is at hand in a way that they can hear? St Benedict, whose feast is today, has been nearly maimed into a political slogan by the ranty right, but the Father of Western Monasticism knew that living the kingdom properly wins converts.

At Mass last night, Fr D reminded us that even Dorothy Day knew you don't do it with "social action" that comes without dogma, but that might be a way in. Finding out that the Church's pro-life action includes housing the homeless, feeding the hungry, clothing the naked, free education for kids and adults, justice for refugees, social services for the poor, medical consultancies (everything from foot-care to drug-interaction advice), and rehab clinics... doing these actions - you can do them all at my parish - will draw others in. Jesus said "let your good deeds shine before men" that they may praise God. Our right action will lead to others coming in for right praise. Our Orthopaxis (which can only flow from our Orthodoxy) will lead to others' Orthodoxy and, in turn, their Orthopraxis as well.

Go out and find the lost sheep... and tell them the Kingdom is here. Now.

And invite them in.

___

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